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S

Stiffy

Guest
Anyone do many concentric repetitions of these? I've done them at times but only for a change, never regularly.
 

White_Lie

Look at Moi, I'm a Kunce
Nordics

I did them for a while with a band to assist on the eccentric. Really like them actually but look like an idiot rigging myself up to do it as I usually have to do them off the standing calf raise machine or something. Why aren't GHR machines more popular?
 

Headley

BigRed Kunce
Sounds like being a pig farmer; ham raising.

Seriously though it looks bloody hard, i don't know what i could practice on though :(

Maybe the heaviest dumbells in the gym would do the trick
 

White_Lie

Look at Moi, I'm a Kunce
Anything you can lock your ankles under. If the benches have flat braces, you can use that. A lot of people do it backwards on the seated calf raise with your ankles where your knees would normally be, load it up with a few plates to take your weight

They are pretty challenging if you're top heavy, especially if you keep your back straight
 
1. I dont think it's doing much if anything for the glute.
2. Compressive force on the knee is high
3. If you're into full ROM it's not provided
4. The resistance increases at an astronimal rate as you move into the extended position
5. Hard to progress on this unless you're into high rep's which could be a disaster

Other than that it's fantastic
 

steveP

Well-known member
I do them all the time. I rig up a half-bosu ball under the leg extension machine. Then there's no pressure on your knees.
 

White_Lie

Look at Moi, I'm a Kunce
Can depending on the equipment available and the type of training you do. They're probably one of the hardest bodyweight exercises to do when done properly and you need very little equipment. I think I get a better stretch in the hams doing these than SLDL's
 

The Hamburgler

Spotter Loader
Can depending on the equipment available and the type of training you do. They're probably one of the hardest bodyweight exercises to do when done properly and you need very little equipment. I think I get a better stretch in the hams doing these than SLDL's

Its unlikely you get a better stretch as the hamstrings never get anywhere near their end range in a Nordic/inverse curl.
definitely get a greater contraction though.
theres a lot of evidence suggesting that activity levels in the different hamstrings (biceps femoris vs semitendonosis/membranosis) differ depending on whether the exercise is hip extension or knee flexion based, and that even whether the proximal or distal fibres activate most is exercise dependent (in other words to work the 'whole length' of the hamstrings you need a variety of exercises)
Eccentric knee flexion strength is also one of the few semi reliable predictors of risk factor of hamstring injury in athletes
 
Its unlikely you get a better stretch as the hamstrings never get anywhere near their end range in a Nordic/inverse curl.
definitely get a greater contraction though.
theres a lot of evidence suggesting that activity levels in the different hamstrings (biceps femoris vs semitendonosis/membranosis) differ depending on whether the exercise is hip extension or knee flexion based, and that even whether the proximal or distal fibres activate most is exercise dependent (in other words to work the 'whole length' of the hamstrings you need a variety of exercises)
Eccentric knee flexion strength is also one of the few semi reliable predictors of risk factor of hamstring injury in athletes

There is no beneficial full contraction of the hamstrings in this exercise when the knee is at 90 degrees.
 
How is there a stretch?
if you do them properly the hip stays in extension

There is no rotation or movement at the hip at all (looking at the vid) the ham's attaching to the lower leg as that dude approaches (lowers) to the floor the hamstring extends.

this is not a good exercise for strengthening the hamstring its more a exhibition of strength an accident waiting to happen
 

The Hamburgler

Spotter Loader
There is no rotation or movement at the hip at all (looking at the vid) the ham's attaching to the lower leg as that dude approaches (lowers) to the floor the hamstring extends.

this is not a good exercise for strengthening the hamstring its more a exhibition of strength an accident waiting to happen

It lengthens, but the hamstring is going through about half of it's available length
I also disagree that it is either a poor strength builder (otherwise we would have to rule out any hamstring curl machine as a good hamstring developer) or an accident waiting to happen provided the athlete is ready to do the movement or it can be regressed appropriately.
There's a reason Russian track coaches have been using it for decades, Louie Simmons developed a machine to perform them assisted and now sports scientists have developed a machine to measure force output whilst performing the exercise
 

The Hamburgler

Spotter Loader
"Low levels of eccentric hamstring strength during the Nordic hamstring exercise increases the risk of future hamstring strain injury in elite Australian footballer"
http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/48/7/647.2


"Put the other way around, if you fail to do your eccentric training, you are 3 times more likely to pull a hamstring!"
https://www.strengthandconditioningresearch.com/perspectives/eccentric-training-muscle-strains/

granted, this may not be AS relevant if you're not playing sports but to call NHE a "poor" exercise isn't just nonsense, it's flat out wrong
 
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