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Smoothie

New member
Just wondering what your thoughts are on the type of training to give the best results. Heavier weights with less reps or more reps with lighter weights? I had friends who were given gym programs where there were about 20 reps per set yet when I used to train years ago we did heavier weights with much less reps, I can't remember exactly but I know some of them were only about 5 reps? I am aiming to loose body fat and get some pretty nicely sculptured muscles, I want shape and strength. I am just recovering from a knee operation in November and have just today started walking without the help of crutches. I have a home gym which hasn't had much use over the last couple of years but has been loved in the past. I have used it on and off but don't think I've ever really known what I was doing or I was just slacking off! Any help or advice would be appreciated :)
 

brendon

New member
8 reps is a good number i reckon.. i think most would do around 8 - 10 in warm up sets then work sets around 5 reps.

i generally do 5 x 5. first 3 sets are easyish, last 2 sets are pretty hard or do 4 x 8

you need to give the muscle a reason to grow, hence the heavy stuff. to little and it wont grow, it will just get strong. to much it wont grow as it thinks you need endurance. needs to be heavy to have a reason to grow, but just enough reps to allow it to grow without endurance part kicking in.
 

Smoothie

New member
Thanks heaps guys, when I get home from my physio session today I will be doing my first workout in a long time, looking forward to it :)
 

dave

Anonymous User
Just wondering what your thoughts are on the type of training to give the best results. Heavier weights with less reps or more reps with lighter weights? I had friends who were given gym programs where there were about 20 reps per set yet when I used to train years ago we did heavier weights with much less reps, I can't remember exactly but I know some of them were only about 5 reps? I am aiming to loose body fat and get some pretty nicely sculptured muscles, I want shape and strength. I am just recovering from a knee operation in November and have just today started walking without the help of crutches. I have a home gym which hasn't had much use over the last couple of years but has been loved in the past. I have used it on and off but don't think I've ever really known what I was doing or I was just slacking off! Any help or advice would be appreciated :)

This all depends on where you are at and how much you like heavy lifting. I will give some women basic movements (Pushups, goblet squats etc) up to 20 reps as a progression (starting at 8ish reps usually). The reason for this is it doesn't scare them off, provides lots of technique work and progresses them easily. Later on then we move to heavier lower rep work as well as some higher rep work.
 

Smoothie

New member
Thanks for the reply Dave. I don't mind a bit of pain, when I first got into the gym over 10 years ago I was sore every day for months, in fact after ever workout there was some level of soreness. My training partner and I would be do back & bis one day, legs the next and then chest and tris the day after that followed by a day of rest and then do it all over again. Every session started out with a cardio warm up and we would so some abs too every session. This worked well and I saw results pretty quickly. I know the weight I was lifting were pretty heavy (for me) I remember lifting 10kg dumbbells for biceps curls at one stage but that was at my peak! I haven't lifted heavy weights for years though so wasn't sure if heavier and less reps was the way to go or if lighter weights and more reps gave better results. I am out of shape that's for sure! I have a 16 month old toddler and I injured my knee last year when he was 6 months old so still have about 13kg's to loose. I'm determined to get there though! 10 months of not being able to move properly has driven me insane!
 

dave

Anonymous User
Thanks for the reply Dave. I don't mind a bit of pain, when I first got into the gym over 10 years ago I was sore every day for months, in fact after ever workout there was some level of soreness. My training partner and I would be do back & bis one day, legs the next and then chest and tris the day after that followed by a day of rest and then do it all over again. Every session started out with a cardio warm up and we would so some abs too every session. This worked well and I saw results pretty quickly. I know the weight I was lifting were pretty heavy (for me) I remember lifting 10kg dumbbells for biceps curls at one stage but that was at my peak! I haven't lifted heavy weights for years though so wasn't sure if heavier and less reps was the way to go or if lighter weights and more reps gave better results. I am out of shape that's for sure! I have a 16 month old toddler and I injured my knee last year when he was 6 months old so still have about 13kg's to loose. I'm determined to get there though! 10 months of not being able to move properly has driven me insane!

You should also begin by training more frequently than the bodypart split you were doing. Get a good progressive full body program to get you moving again and.work your ass off (literally) and you will easily be back in shape with some discipline in the kitchen. There are a few good nutrition threads on here or better yet go read some of Alan Aragon or Lyle McDonalds work.
 

kaz

iLift
I remember starting with basic body weight squats, push ups on knees, heavily assisted pull ups, 8kg kettlebell deadlifts and tiny box jumps. Always in a circuit that included light walking jogging or gentle rowing. This eventually turned into heavier weights and lower reps.
Point is when youre starting from scratch, easy does it!
Now I go heaviest weight and aim for 8 - 10 reps, and 10 is a struggle! Only way to progress!
 

BigJim

Member
You will get a bigger chest benching 100kgx10 then you will 60kgx10. In my oppinion increase your strength as quick as you can by using lower reps so that you are pushing decent weights before you try for hypertrophy.

What are your current lifts for bench, squat, dead and ohp?
 

IRON TANKS

Site Advertiser
Varies with programs/what you want to achieve as well the lift.

Deadlifts I train in a lower rep range (1-5). Same with squats. I'm not looking for thicker wheels, just stronger ones. Most of my training is in the 8-10 rep range. There's an individual component as always, and this is what my body responds to best.
 

Smoothie

New member
AndyMitchell & Fadi, thanks for your advice, I think I will end up varying it then.

Dave thanks for the nutrition info, I looked up those guys and they know their stuff. I plan to work my butt off!

Minchia I'm going to need big wheels so thanks for your advice.

Deep I like the sound of that when I can move more.

BigJim, my current lifts are 0. I'm not kidding ;) I'm recovering from an operation atm.

TLS I was born with what they call shallow knee caps. They sit up high and slip out really easily as structurally my knees are not lined up properly with the tibia. I've dislocated both knees at least a dozen times in my life doing everything from walking to playing squash. This is why I have loved the gym on and off over the years. Sure there's pain in weight lifting but it's a controlled exercise and it's very unlikely that I will pop my knee out.

As for squats, they are part of my physio recovery. I do need to build my upper legs nice and strong to help pull the knee caps in rather than them slipping out. But I can hardly squat very far, it's more like 1/20th of a squat!

I have just started walking without crutches for the bulk of the day but by bed time I can really feel it. I'm going to need to start out building my upper body and just do the physio on the lower half for now. I've only done one workout so far as I've been too sore. Excuses, excuses... :rolleyes: It was a major operation where I could not weight bare for 6 weeks as they broke the tibia and moved it over then screwed in back down.
 

Fadi

...
Excuses, excuses... :rolleyes: It was a major operation where I could not weight bare for 6 weeks as they broke the tibia and moved it over then screwed in back down.
No NEVER! There's one hell of a difference between excuses excuses and legitimate REASONS for doing or not doing certain things (not only physically/sport related, but life in general). I want you to know full well that there's no need for you to:

1. Explain yourself (your actions) to us here or to anyone outside of this place and...

2. There's no need for you to feel guilty or obliged to do anything before the appropriate time arrives. Picking a fruit off a tree before it has ripened would only leave a sour or bitter taste in your mouth, instead of the heavenly sweetness that was meant to be.

I know what it is to be injured and having to learn the art of walking again.

Look after numero uno, period!

Peace and God bless.


Fadi.
 

piecone

New member
Just wondering what your thoughts are on the type of training to give the best results. Heavier weights with less reps or more reps with lighter weights?

Smaller 'tougher' muscles like calves I like to go as high as 15 reps with as much weight as I can manage to failure. Lateral raises (standard and bent over) I also like to go up to 15 reps but with 'good form' weight, so really concentrate on mechanics over weight.

For all else, I like 6-10 rep range, sometimes pyramiding up, sometimes just waiting for my body to progress in strength/stamina (it is after all a progressive resistance sport).
 

MaxBrenner

New member
Both rep ranges have their place and a number of studies actually show that the in between to be optimal for hypertrophy.

But with that said, a solid base made up of strength training (low reps high weight) is going to be most beneficial for both composition and continual progression.
 
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