• Keep up to date with Ausbb via Twitter and Facebook. Please add us!
  • Join the Ausbb - Australian BodyBuilding forum

    If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact contact us.

    The Ausbb - Australian BodyBuilding forum is dedicated to no nonsense muscle and strength building. If you need advice that works, you have come to the right place. This forum focuses on building strength and muscle using the basics. You will also find that the Ausbb- Australian Bodybuilding Forum stresses encouragement and respect. Trolls and name calling are not allowed here. No matter what your personal goals are, you will be given effective advice that produces results.

    Please consider registering. It takes 30 seconds, and will allow you to get the most out of the forum.
I wonder how he'd go with your regular shoulders wide stance.

i reckon there should be some controls on this.
 

Shrek

Fucked up Kunce
Me too.
Barely comes up 20-30cm off the floor. I liken it to an extremely arched back bench press. Oh no!!!
 

The Hamburgler

Spotter Loader
I'm curious as to which of these you believe he failed to comply with

"Deadlift
  1. The lifter shall face the front of the platform with the bar laid horizontally in front of the lifters feet, gripped with anoptional grip in both hands and lifted until the lifter is standing erect.
  2. On completion of the lift the knees shall be locked in a straight position and the shoulders back.
  3. The Chief Referee’s signal shall consist of a downward movement of the arm and the audible command “Down”. The
    signal will not be given until the bar is held motionless and the lifter is in the apparent finished position.
  4. Any rising of the bar or any deliberate attempt to do so will count as an attempt. Once the attempt has begun nodownward movement is allowed until the lifter reaches the erect position with the knees locked. If the bar settles as the
    shoulders come back (slightly downward on completion) this should not be reason to disqualify the lift.
Causes for Disqualification of a Deadlift:

  1. Any downward movement of the bar before it reaches the final position.
  2. Failure to stand erect with the shoulders back.
  3. Failure to lock the knees straight at the completion of the lift.
  4. Supporting the bar on the thighs during the performance of the lift. If the bar edges up the thigh but is not supported this
    is not reason for disqualification. The lifter should benefit in all decisions of doubt made by the referee.
  5. Stepping backward or forward or moving the feet laterally. Rocking the feet between the ball and heel is permitted. Foot
    movement after the command “Down” will not be cause for failure.
  6. Lowering the bar before receiving the Chief Referee’s signal.
  7. Allowing the bar to return to the platform without maintaining control with both hands, i.e., releasing the bar from the
    palms of the hand.
  8. Failure to comply with any of the items outlined under Rules of Performance. "

    Source: http://www.powerlifting-ipf.com/fil...english/IPF_Technical_Rules_Book_2016__1_.pdf
 
I don't care about the 'rules' set by whatever powerlifting organisation, to me that's not a proper deadlift, just like moving a bar for 4" is not a proper benchpress
All they've done is move the goal posts further apart to get greater numbers
 
Last edited:

Repacked

Punxsutawney resident
I don't care about the 'rules' set by whatever powerlifting organisation, to me that's not a proper deadlift, just like moving a bar for 4" is not a proper benchpress
All they've done is move the goal posts further apart to get greater numbers

 

The Hamburgler

Spotter Loader
I don't care about the 'rules' set by whatever powerlifting organisation, to me that's not a proper deadlift, just like moving a bar for 4" is not a proper benchpress
All they've done is move the goal posts further apart to get greater numbers

Yes because your opinion is oh so valued by . . . Who exactly?

not to mention the ~12 biggest deadlifts ever done (probably more) have been done with a close stance, which by your argument is cause for close stance to not be considered a 'real' 'deadlift' and merely 'moving goal posts further apart'
 
This is what makes the squat such a good exercise, From a coaching standpoint, I found variations of the squat
of great value... high rep squatting with light weights (and
"breathing squats")...modified free-hand "hindu squats"
(modified from traditional "hindu squats"(Karl Gotch-Style)
in that the knee stays in the same place...never goes "over
the toe"...rear end kicked way back...no patella tendon
problems) for high reps... even just plain free-hand (no
weight) squats done for high reps (50-100) are enough to
put a lot of strong guys on the floor...
 
Is it a dead-lift?

It's a variation of an exercise, there are so many, is it a good execise? Hell no it will fuck up your hip, but this is the PL forum and you do what you can to move as much weight as you can through the shortest distance possible.
 

The Hamburgler

Spotter Loader
Is it a dead-lift?

It's a variation of an exercise, there are so many, is it a good execise? Hell no it will fuck up your hip, but this is the PL forum and you do what you can to move as much weight as you can through the shortest distance possible.

"Wide stance will fuck up your hip" is a cop out by people who don't understand anatomy and can't coach the movement properly
Sure, if you've got the mobility of a plank of wood then feet out near the plates isn't going to end well but a normal width sumo (whatever normal means) is no worse than a narrow conventional stance on the structures of the hip joint itself
For 99% of the population the anatomically "safest" position for the hips for both squats and deadlifts is going to be with the inside of the ankle in line or very slightly outside the edge of the medial delt in normal standing posture with the hands by their sides
 
Top